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CONTACT US       Adeline Reidy,    1 Castle Street, Dover   TEL. 01304 211591 EMAIL. adelinereidy@btconnect.com

 

                           David Hannent, 16 Castle Street, Dover  TEL.01304 240000  EMAIL. david@pmcs.net

Hanging_basket Castle_Street_in_Bloom__TN Castle_St_Pharos_Tea_House__TN societyneedsyou WeThePeople

 

CSASLOGO

castle street society dover history st james council development heritage harbour

castle street society dover history st james council development heritage harbour

castle street society dover history st james council development heritage harbour

castle street society dover history st james council development heritage harbour

castle street dover kent

castle street dover kent

castle street dover kent

Dover Castle news future st james development dover kent

Dover Castle news future st james development dover kent

Dover Castle news future st james development dover kent

Dover Castle news future st james development dover kent

Dover Castle news future st james development dover kent

Dover Castle news future st james development dover kent

Introduction to Area History

Dovorian, Budge Adams, described the land reclaimed from the old harbour between the East and West Brooks and the sea, as the Dover's Golden Triangle. This, to my mind, is an apt title for although Dover is rich in historic monuments, from the Castle to the Roman Painted House, from the Maison Dieu to the Western Heights, the Golden Triangle is of equally historic importance. However, unlike the other Dover gems, there is very little information on the area to hand. This series of thumbnail sketches of the area aims to rectify this.

 

In pre-historic times a deep cleft in the chalky cliff was made by the river Dour and as the nearest crossing point to the Continent, Dover became of strategic importance. Julius Caesar paid a brief visit on 25 August 55BC but in 43 AD, the Romans returned and built a great harbour on the wide river Dour estuary. Unearthed groyns, quays and hawser rings suggest that their harbour was within the area of what are now King Street, Castle Street, Russell Street and St James Street.

 

During the five centuries of Roman occupation, the Dour estuary changed with two distinct streams forming, the East and West Brook. At that time, Eastbrook offered the best course to the sea and below Warden Down, the cliff behind the present Sports Centre, a new harbour was formed. The Westbrook entered the sea just beyond where Mill Lane is now. In between, on a delta of dry land, was the town’s shipbuilding industry.

 

By the time that William I invaded England in 1066, the Eastbrook harbour was of national importance and the King made a grant to the town’s Burgesses to ensure the continuation of their services. On the Westbrook, the King’s half brother, Odo, Earl of Kent, it was said, allowed a tidal mill to be built that eventually caused a build up of silt making the stream unnavigable.

 

Over the next 300 years Eastbrook harbour proved to be a great success, with royalty, both English and foreign, using Dover as the principal port for passage to and from the Continent. However, between 1300 and 1500 there was a movement of land mass that triggered a phenomenon called the Eastward Drift – the tide sweeping round Shakespeare Cliff and depositing masses of pebbles at the eastern end of the bay. This, together with a cliff fall, rendered the Eastbrook harbour useless and a new harbour was created at the western side of the bay.

Continue to Part 2 Back to History About the Author image005